Blackwater founder Erik Prince charging $6.5K to get people out of Afghanistan

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Defense contractor and Blackwater founder Erik Prince is reportedly chartering planes to get people out of Afghanistan — but only for those who can cough up thousands of dollars for a seat.

For the hefty price of $6,500, Prince is guaranteeing people that he can get them safely into Kabul’s Hamid Karzai airport and onto a charter flight, the Wall Street Journal reported on Wednesday.

He is charging extra if people are trapped in their homes and need assistance getting to the airport, the report said.

It wasn’t immediately clear if Prince had the money, or means, to carry out such rescues.

It also wasn’t clear who exactly he is offering the rescue flights to — whether it was only American citizens, or if flush US allies and Afghans could pay for a seat.

11,200 people were evacuated on 42 US military flights out of Kabul in the 24 hours ending Wednesday morning.
WAKIL KOHSAR/AFP via Getty Images

Prince — a former Navy SEAL and Trump ally — co-founded the private military company Blackwater in 1997, which is now known as Academi.

Blackwater was known in the US for furnishing some of the rougher military contractors during the Iraq War.

His company gained attention in 2007 when his contractors killed 17 Iraqi civilians in the Nisour Square massacre. Four agents were convicted in 2014 over the attack but were all pardoned by Trump in December last year.

Crowds of people wait outside the airport in Kabul, Afghanistan August 25, 2021 in this picture obtained from social media.
Since Aug. 14, about 82,300 people have been evacuated on US military and allied flights.
Twitter/DAVID_MARTINON via REUTERS

More recently, Prince — who is the brother of Trump’s education secretary Betsy DeVos — was accused of violating the UN arms embargo against Libya, according to a report to the UN Security Council. Prince denied any wrongdoing.

His $6,500 offer to help get people out of Afghanistan comes as Americans and Afghans rush to flee Kabul as the window for evacuations inches closer.

He is among the many contractors, veterans and aid workers trying to get as many people out of Kabul as possible before President Biden’s Aug. 31 deadline.

Taliban fighters march in uniforms on the street in Qalat, Zabul Province, Afghanistan.
Taliban fighters march in uniforms on the street in Qalat, Zabul Province, Afghanistan.
REUTERS/File Photo

The Taliban has ordered all US troops to be out by that deadline or warned there would be consequences.

US forces have been sending out special rescue teams into the city to help get Americans to the airport.

Biden warned on Tuesday there was a “growing risk” of a terror attack by ISIS’ Afghan affiliate ISIS-K but insisted the US was “on pace” to withdraw from Afghanistan by the deadline.

U.S. Air Force airmen guide evacuees aboard a U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III at Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul, Afghanistan.
U.S. Air Force airmen guide evacuees aboard a U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III at Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul, Afghanistan.
Senior Airman Taylor Crul/U.S. Air Force via AP

Another 11,200 people were evacuated on 42 US military flights out of Kabul in the 24 hours ending Wednesday morning, the White House said. About 7,800 people were also evacuated on allied flights.

Since Aug. 14, about 82,300 people have been evacuated on US military and allied flights, according to the White House.

 

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