ICU beds in short supply as COVID-19 cases continue to spike

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Intensive care unit beds are in short supply as coronavirus cases continue to spike across the country, fueled by the Delta variant. The nation saw a 14% jump in the number of COVID-19 cases caused by the highly contagious strain, according to the CDC. 

ICU beds in Tennessee are in such high demand that one unit had to be converted from cardiac care. A tented field hospital was built alongside the University of Mississippi Jackson. 

Health professionals aren't holding back on their frustrations amid COVID vaccine conspiracy theories spreading online. 

“Today, when we need to be trusted more than ever, people are doubting us and we need to trust the science behind the vaccine and utilize the only defense that we have,” one nurse told CBS News. 

While the number of vaccinations has increased in recent weeks, they aren't going up fast enough in many places like Kansas.

“The situation in Kansas is cause for real concern. Nearly all the people admitted to our ICUs with COVID issues are unvaccinated,” Kansas Governor Laura Kelly said.

She's asking school boards to take action fast to help protect students who will be returning to school this fall. 

“I urge every school board across Kansas that hasn't already to implement mask requirements in their schools.  Until the vaccine is approved for children under 12, masks can prevent students from quarantine and getting very sick or dying from COVID-19,” she said. 

A police department in southwest Illinois shut down after every officer tested positive. In Tennessee, when 23 faculty members of Fairview Middle School called out sick, school administrators called a snow day — upsetting some parents.

“If we're using the inclement weather days. How is it going to affect when we really need them? How is one closed day going to suffice for the 14-day quarantine?” said parent Jamesia Dowell.

In Texas, a state court sided with one county's decision to require masks for students after Texas Governor Greg Abbott took a no-mask stand. 

“It gives us and when I say us I mean the county, the municipalities, the school districts, health authorities and other government officials in Fort Bend County an opportunity to do the right thing, the right thing when it comes to practicing, protecting our citizens, our families and our most vulnerable, our children,” said Fort Bend County Judge KP George. 

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